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Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters
Surg Metab Nutr 2014;5(1):1-4
Published online June 30, 2014
© 2014 The Korean Society of Surgical Metabolism and Nutrition.

Sanghyun Ahn, M.D.

Department of Surgery, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
Correspondence to: Sanghyun Ahn, Department of Surgery, Yeouido St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 10 63-ro, Yeongdeungpo-gu, Seoul 150-713, Korea
Tel: +82-2-3779-1063, Fax: +82-2-786-0802, E-mail: angio@catholic.ac.kr
Received May 12, 2014; Accepted May 26, 2014.
This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract
Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) are inserted percutaneously into peripheral veins (e.g. the basilic or cephalic vein et al.) and the tip of the catheter is most often placed in the superior vena cava or at the cavo-atrial junction. Since introduction of PICCs into clinical practice 30 years ago, PICCs have gained increasing popularity. The relative ease of placement, low complication rate, ability to be introduced at the bedside, and infrequent need for replacement will make PICCs more useful tools for patients requiring central access. The purpose of this article is to review the indications, contraindications, insertion methods, and complications of PICCs. (Surg Metab Nurtr 2014;5:1-4)
Keywords : Peripherally inserted central catheters, Central access, Methods


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